Following the announcement that of all Easyjet’s passengers, those flying out of Manchester are most inclined out to sit back and relax with a G&T, it was appropriate that we recently found ourselves in a brand new gin distillery that is attempting to capture the spirit of Manchester’s industrial and cultural past in a bottle.

Manchester Three Rivers Gin takes its name from the Irwell, Irk and Medlock rivers which pumped life into the city and helped it become the greatest industrial city in the world.

3rivers4

These producers of this new super premium gin are placing a lot of emphasis on celebrating Manchester’s achievements and contributing to the resurgence of the Green Quarter, an area with a rich history of creativity and productivity.

Motives aside, master distiller Dave Rigby has created something that not only rivals the popular London gins, but has the potential to knock them out of the water.

3rivers2

Three Rivers has that classic perfume aroma we associate with gin, but rather than following up with an extremely dry and bitter finish, it’s pleasantly smooth and sweet, thanks to the addition of vanilla, cinnamon, almond and oats.

It’s clear that they know what they’re doing, but if you think you can do better, you have the opportunity to make your own gin when the first Gin Experience tours take place starting on 18th August.

For £95.00 you will receive four complimentary drinks (G&T’s or cocktails), a paid bar that will be open following the tour and the chance to produce your own 700ml bottle using their mini copper post stills, choosing from over 50 botanicals.

3rivers5

Situated in Redbank, this modern distillery makes its small-batch gin with the help of Angel, a stunning 450l copper pot Arnold Holstein still. The layout of the distillery makes for an interactive and immersive experience, where visitors can get up close with Angel or view the large screen from the upper balcony.

It’s clear that there is ambition to develop Manchester’s reputation on the gin scene and drive a deeper understanding and appreciation of the culture and craft which go into producing each bottle. And that can only be a good thing for the thriving independent food and drink scene we have in this city.

What's on your mind?